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Christoph Nedopil Wang

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Dr. Christoph Nedopil Wang is the Director of the Green Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and Senior Research Fellow at the International Institute of Green Finance (IIGF) of the Central University of Finance and Economics (CUFE).

Leading up to the 2nd Belt and Road Forum from April 24-26 in Beijing, various working groups, think tanks and government agencies published accounts of the past achievements and challenges of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). One of these accounts was given by the Advisory Council of the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation (the BRF Advisory Council) in their report “Belt and Road Cooperation: For a Better World”. This article analyzes on the report’s suggestions in regards to green finance and explains some possible backgrounds of the suggestions. This should help to improve the understanding of challenges and thus the successful acceleration of the Belt and Road Initiative. Background and Overview of BRI improvement suggestions by the BRF Advisory Council Since the announcement of the Belt and Road Initiative in 2013, more than 100 countries have signed instruments of cooperation with China to promote the Belt and…

This is an extended version of the China Daily’s article from April 26. In 2017, the Chinese Ministry of Environment together with 4 other ministries released the “Guidance on Promoting Green Belt and Road”. Realizing this ambition requires green finance – the full range of financial services that support the transformation to an environmentally and climate-friendly economy. Green Finance in China has seen a strong development based on the “Guidelines for Establishing the Green Financial System” published by The People’s Bank of China and six other government agencies in 2016. In 2018, the Chinese green bond market became the second largest in the world after the United States with issuances of USD30 billion. Scaling and accelerating these experiences to greening the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) is a long-term, but achievable goal. Failing to green the BRI would have potentially catastrophic climate impacts around the World. Using green finance to…

In April 2019, the 2nd “Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation” will be held in Beijing with many heads of governments and business shaking hands and discussing opportunities of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). Until then, critics and proponents of the Belt and Road Initiative will increasingly weigh in their opinions on advantages and risks of the Belt and Road Initiative, such as the Chinese newspaper China Daily titling on March 12, 2019 that the “BRI is hailed as a force for sustainable development”[1] or CNBC`s feature earlier this year that “Fears of excessive debt drive more countries to cut down their Belt and Road investments”[2]. Source: China Daily, March 12, 2019Source: CNBC, January 17, 2019 As with most judgments, also the judgment on the success or failure of the BRI will depend on the perspectives taken. This article analyzes the potentials of BRI investments to leapfrog BRI…

On March 24, Italy’s government, as the first government of a G7 country and the 11th government of the European Union, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to strengthen relationships with China within its Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). As Italy is thus far the largest economy signing up for the Belt and Road Initiative, a lot of attention and scrutiny has been given to this signature. In this article we shed some light on the background of the deal, why critics of the MoU are possibly overstating their case, and about some factors that can support or undermine the success of the deal – and with it taint or polish the image of the Chinese-driven Belt and Road Initiative. Our findings say that the most important success factors are sustainable and green economic growth in line with Italy’s core economic interests – export and tourism while adding investment (not…